theilluminatormobilizer:

The Illuminator projected this near the Brooklyn Bridge in solidarity with the people of Ferguson.

(via missjuliamazing)

captoring:

raisehelia:

Don’t say “I’m not like other girls.”

Be like other girls and meld with other girls and become one with the glorious mass of writhing womanhood that will roll over the towns and the cities and devour all space and all time.

i like how our response to day-to-day shitty events of misogyny/homophobia/etc has officially become this brand of nightmarish surrealism and it genuinely makes me feel better

(via moniquill)

gr0sse:

KIDS REACT TO existentialism and the inevitability of death

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

(via iamacollectionofmiscellanyandtea)

(Source: nevermindtheb0ll0cks, via itsgrrrlgerm)

deadtrash:

"thats not very lady-like of you"

image

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

"I have always looked upon decay as being just as wonderful and rich an expression of life as growth."

Henry Miller (via ancient-serpent)

(Source: fernsandmoss, via vegan-veins)

imreallybad:

repeat after me: 

  • virginity is a social construct 
  • you don’t lose your virginity 
  • there’s nothing valuable or precious about virginity, it’s an imaginary concept 
  • virginity is inherently heterocentric 
  • your worth is not defined by whether or not you’ve had a dick inside you
  • what you define as sex is up to you, you get to decide how many people you’ve had sex with 
  • the end 

(via psychopath-e)

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because during summer a group of drunk men catcalled me while i was alone at the beach.
I’m twelve and I’ve been so scared of strange men since that I need pepper spray to feel safe.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because during summer a group of drunk men catcalled me while i was alone at the beach.

I’m twelve and I’ve been so scared of strange men since that I need pepper spray to feel safe.

(Source: -teesa-, via fuckyeahloldemort)

ponnukaka:

shinycroissants:

“I remember when I was doing “Rent” and I was too thin, and I was doing that on purpose because I’m dying, I’m a HIV+ drug addict. I remember having to eat raw food and doing all this work to make sure I could stay thin… And I remember everyone asking me when I was doing press for the movie, “what did you do to get so thin? You looked great!” and I’m like, “I looked emaciated.” It’s a form of violence in the way that we look at women and how we expect them to look and be, for… what’s sake? No…

I love her so much, you guys.

ponnukaka:

shinycroissants:

“I remember when I was doing “Rent” and I was too thin, and I was doing that on purpose because I’m dying, I’m a HIV+ drug addict. I remember having to eat raw food and doing all this work to make sure I could stay thin… And I remember everyone asking me when I was doing press for the movie, “what did you do to get so thin? You looked great!” and I’m like, “I looked emaciated.” It’s a form of violence in the way that we look at women and how we expect them to look and be, for… what’s sake? No…

I love her so much, you guys.

(via queeringfeministreality)

stfumras:

tiredestprincess:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

THIS is what a men’s rights activist should be.  

(via queeringfeministreality)

Hahahahaahhaha

Hahahahaahhaha

(Source: moriarty, via missjuliamazing)

fuckyeahveganlife:

vegan pumpkin muffins

fuckyeahveganlife:

vegan pumpkin muffins

(via jusdechatte)

(Source: the--pessimist, via glitteryclitorous)